Woman slits husbands throat, claims she was dreaming of filleting a fish

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A Dillonvale woman charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault after authorities say she claimed she was dreaming about filleting a fish when she sliced her husband’s throat in his sleep went before a Jefferson County judge for her arraignment Monday.

JJON0728_5149 (1)ond was set at half a million dollars for Judy Jones, 44, in a shocking case of domestic violence that authorities say could have ended in murder if the couple’s daughter hadn’t acted.

“She made threats that she was going to kill him,” Jefferson County Sheriff Fred Abdalla said. “And she almost did early Saturday morning. So she’s been charged now with the prosecutor handling the case got her charged with felony 1s and 2 for attempted murder and aggravated assault.”

This all happened at the family’s home at 19 2nd Street in Dillionvale and Abdalla said this isn’t the first time Judy Jones thought about killing her husband. Abdalla says Jones’ daughter told investigators her mother had been planning this for about a year, and that 16-year old girl’s call to 911 immediately after it happened likely saved her father’s life. Thomas Jones, 49, is in the hospital recovering. “He’s got stitches from almost (ear to ear) so we just have to wait for it to go through the court system,” Abdalla said.

Investigators said Judy Jones eventually changed her story and admitted trying to kill her husband. She told the court she can’t afford a lawyer. She’ll be back in court again Wednesday afternoon.

True of false. You can have a key made and shipped to you by emailing a picture of any key

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When I broke into my neighbor’s home earlier this week, I didn’t use any cat burglar skills. I don’t know how to pick locks. I’m not even sure how to use a crowbar. It turns out all anyone needs to invade a friend’s apartment is an off switch for their conscience and an iPhone.

This was done politely: I even warned him the day before. My neighbor lives on the second floor of a Brooklyn walk-up, so when I came to his front door he tossed me a pair of keys rather than walk down the stairs to let me in. I opened the door, climbed the stairs, and handed his keys back to him. We chatted about our weekends. I drank a glass of water. Then I let him know that I would be back soon to gain unauthorized access to his home.

Less than an hour later, I owned a key to his front door.

What I didn’t tell my neighbor was that I spent about 30 seconds in the stairwell scanning his keys with software that would let me reproduce them with no specialized skills whatsoever. The iPhone app I used wasn’t intended for anything so nefarious: KeyMe was designed to let anyone photograph their keys and upload them to the company’s servers. From there, they can be 3-D printed and mail-ordered in a variety of novelty shapes, from a bottle opener to Kanye West’s head. Or they can be cut from blanks at one of KeyMe’s five kiosks in the New York City area.

PARKING VALETS SUDDENLY REQUIRE A LUDICROUS LEVEL OF TRUST.

Screen-Shot-2014-07-25-at-10.04.37-AM1-271x300I copied my neighbor’s keys at a KeyMe kiosk about a mile from his house, inside a Rite Aid drugstore. After logging in on a fingerprint scanner and choosing my neighbor’s keys from all the keys I’d uploaded, I watched on the machine’s screen as a grandfatherly cartoon figure with a white mustache and spectacles cut them. Seconds later the keys dropped into a box at the front of the kiosk, still warm to the touch. The next morning I let myself into my neighbor’s apartment and interrupted him reading a book about the German battleship Bismarck.

Unintended Consequences

Services like KeyMe, along with competitors like KeysDuplicated and the Belgian Keysave, promise to forever solve the problem of lockouts and lost keys using clever combinations of smartphone scans, automated key-cutting machines and 3D-printing. Like a “forgot my password” function for physical security, they let you upload your coded chunks of metal to the cloud, where you can access and duplicate them, or even email them to a friend staying at your place.

New York-based KeyMe reassures users on its website that “only you can scan your keys” and its “scanning process is designed to strictly prevent any use of flyby pictures.” It claims keys can only be scanned when removed from the keychain (Not so; I left my neighbor’s on his ring) and must be scanned on both sides against a white background from 4 inches away. None of that posed a problem making my stairwell creep-scans.Such services also enable jerks like me to steal your keys any time they get a moment alone with them. Leave your ring of cut-brass secrets unattended on your desk at work, at a bar table while you buy another round, or in a hotel room, and any stranger—or friend—can upload your keys to their online collection. The trick is far easier than having them copied at a hardware store. KeyMe says it will even duplicate keys marked “do not duplicate,” including some high-security keys sold by Medeco, Mul-T-lock and Schlage. Parking valets suddenly require a ludicrous level of trust: KeyMe already allows some car keys to be scanned and mail-ordered; KeysDuplicated says that feature is on the way.

KeysDuplicated, based in San Francisco, doesn’t make any claims about requiring close-ups for its keyshots. But its CEO Ali Rahimi wrote in a statement to WIRED that “we’re not a convenient service for anyone who wants to copy keys
surreptitiously.” The company’s site argues thieves have always been able to measure keys with a key gauge or imprint them in clay to create duplicates. But I have no idea how to do either of those things, and I nonetheless found breaking into my neighbor’s house with a smartphone scan to be pretty idiot-proof.

When I spoke with KeyMe founder and CEO Greg Marsh, he offered another argument: Digitally reproducing keys is safer than other methods because it leaves a digital trail with KeyMe’s account information, credit card records, and its kiosk fingerprint scanners. “We have all this accountability and data that doesn’t exist when you make keys with traditional methods,” Marsh says. “If a key was found to be used maliciously, we have a clear path to find out who was responsible.”

So if I had actually entered my neighbor’s apartment while he was gone and burgled the place without him knowing, how would that accountability have helped? Marsh says that if my neighbor reported the theft and suspected KeyMe was involved, he could scan his keys into KeyMe and discover who had previously copied them. Marsh hedged that by saying the company would be very cautious about handing user data to the police, but the company “would be very enthusiastic about helping any way we could.”

Even if KeyMe did help the cops, Marsh’s logic is somewhat flawed. My neighbor had never heard of KeyMe or any services like it. If his apartment was robbed, he would have no clue that a little-known app had anything to do with it. “Most of the country has no idea what KeyMe is, and that will hopefully change soon,” says Marsh. “We’re working really hard to build awareness.”

Keep It in Your Pants

Wishful thinking aside, Marsh’s best piece of advice is, “People need to be prudent with where they have their keys and store them, similar to a password.”

That paranoid approach has long been common sense among the lockpicking crowd. “If you lose sight of your keys for the better part of 20 seconds, you should consider them lost,” says Jos Weyers, a Dutch lockpicking guru and security consultant. “If you find them later, consider them a souvenir.”

At the HOPE hacker conference last weekend, Weyers gave a presentation on the insecurity of showing photos of keys on television or allowing them to be photographed. He pointed to examples like the New York Post‘s foolish decision to publish pictures of New York elevator and subway gate keys in a story discussing the danger of letting those keys proliferate. (The Post‘s photo was soon taken down, but not before it spread across the web.) In another slip-up, a local newscast showed a close-up of a “universal gas pump key” that could be used to plant credit-card stealing hardware in the pump station.

“IT ONLY TAKES SECONDS TO DUPLICATE A KEY. WE LOCK NERDS ALREADY KNEW THAT.”

In any of those cases, a skilled lock hacker could recreate the key from the photos alone, using increasingly accessible tools like 3D printers, milling machines, or laser cutters. One group of researchers created a project called Sneakey in 2009 that showed they could reproduce keys photographed from nearly 200 feet away and at an angle. In other words, simply leaving your keys hanging from your belt presents a security problem, not to mention letting someone get ahold of them.

That means apps like KeyMe and KeysDuplicated haven’t exactly created the requirement that our physical keys be kept as secret as our digital ones. But they have democratized the security threat: Now even a lockpicking noob like me can demonstrate the danger of letting keys leave their owner’s control.

In a way, says Weyers, that’s a good thing. “The effect of services like KeyMe will be positive: People are now starting to understand that it only take a couple of seconds to duplicate a key,” he says. “We lock nerds already knew that. Now the normal public is catching on.”

Cops Arrest South Carolina Woman For Possessing Urine That Tested Positive For Methamphetamine

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urinesample2A woman who was carrying a bottle filled with her own urine is facing a drug possession charge after the liquid tested positive for methamphetamine, according to cops who surmised that the suspect was planning to extract traces of the drug from the bodily waste.

Cops confronted Cindy Wingo, 33, last Wednesday after spotting her and a male acquaintance loitering outside a vacant South Carolina home. During a subsequent investigation, Wingo consented to an examination of her purse.

According to a Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office report, deputies found drug paraphernalia items during the search. Wingo, an investigator noted, “has in the past used illicit substances (i.e., methamphetamine).”

Deputies also discovered a pill bottle filled with urine. Wingo said that while the container belonged to her daughter, “it was her urine that was in the bottle,” reported Deputy Chaney Brown. Asked about the urine, Brown added, “Cindy was evasive with her answer, and would not give me a straight answer.”

cindywingoBrown, who has been trained in “methamphetamine and clandestine lab assessment,” reported that, “it is not an uncommon practice for Methamphetamine users to not discard their urine, due to the fact that a portion of the Methamphetamine is excreted out through the urination process.” Users, Bown added, can then “extract the Methamphetamine from the urine or give it to someone who knows how to do this in exchange for more Methamphetamine.”

“Having this in mind, I field tested the liquid in the prescription bottle,” Brown wrote. “It field tested positive for Methamphetamine.”

Wingo, seen at left, was subsequently arrested for drug possession and booked into the county jail. She was released from custody after posting $5000 bond and is scheduled for a September 25 court appearance.

Rats Entered Corpses Through Vagina And Anus At D.C. Hospital, Ex-Worker Says

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Are you about to eat? Don’t start if you’re going to read this.

n-MORGUE-large300A rat infestation at Providence Hospital in Washington, D.C, was so bad that the rodents were entering corpses through the vagina and anus, a former worker says.

Doris Kennard won a $237,000 judgment for emotional distress against the hospital on July 18, court records show. A lawyer for the hospital said “we vehemently disagree with the verdict” and will appeal.

In a stomach-churning interview (above) with Fox News in D.C., Kennard recounted some of the details from her stint as a contract worker in the hospital morgue several years ago: Rats chewed through the body bags to feast on the cadavers. In 2010, one rat even attacked her, landing her in the hospital.

Kennard, whose job was in part to clean the deceased, said in documents that she pulled what she believed to be the string of a “feminine product” out of a cadaver and it turned out to be a rat, which then bit her.

She told the station that the problem was so intense that she could not get someone else to work with her.

Kennard theorized that the morgue’s coolers broke down, so bodies warmed and perhaps attracted the vermin from a nearby hospital trash compactor. Kennard’s lawyer, Gregory Lattimer, accused the hospital of a coverup in the report and said the infestation has persisted for decades.

A hospital rep told HuffPost on Friday, “The District of Columbia Department of Health and two of their field inspectors toured our facilities today and found absolutely no evidence that would support the claims that were alleged.”

The hospital gift shop was closed by health inspectors in January after they spotted rodent droppings and a “bag of food chewed on by some sort of pest,” D.C. outlet WUSA 9 reported.

Kennard originally filed the suit in December 2012, according to records. An attorney for the hospital asked for a mistrial on July 17 but was rejected.

The hospital’s attorney, Hugh W. Farrell with Farrell & Gunderson, offered the following statement:

We vehemently disagree with the verdict and will file an appeal. At the time of the alleged incident, a thorough investigation was completed by the Hospital and the District of Columbia Department of Health which revealed no truth to the allegations. There was absolutely no evidence of the alleged rat activity. We look forward to correcting this verdict on appeal.

This Terrifying Free-Fall Drop Ride Offers ‘Nothing But a Net’ to Keep You Alive

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Imagine falling nearly 100 feet at a speed of 55MPH with no safety harness on and nothing to end your fall but a net suspended a few feet over cold, hard concrete.

We think we’d pass out, but the brave souls who partake in Denmark’s “Sky Tower” ride seem to have an absolute blast.

Check out the multiple POV film by Robb Alvey and Craig Knight. And if you’re a natural thrill-seeker, don’t be surprised if you find yourself buying tickets to Denmark’s Tivoli Friheden amusement park right after watching it.

Parents of the year, Lock 5-Year-Old in Car Trunk to Cure Fear of Dark

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parents-lock-child-in-car-trunk-558x279A western Pennsylvania couple, accused of luring their five-year-old son into the trunk of their car with candy to resolve his fear of the dark, was granted probation this week, according to court officials on Friday.

Jeffrey and Danielle Lenhart were charged with felony child endangerment and reckless endangerment for locking their son in the car during three trips to the Idlewild amusement park in Lingonier, Pennsylvania, in July 2013, court records showed.

They gave him a flashlight and told him to look for sweets before locking the trunk at the park, about 9.5-miles (15 km) from their home in Latrobe, court officials said.

They were accepted into the Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition program on Thursday in a deal approved by Westmoreland County Judge Richard McCormick Jr., according to Danielle Lenhart’s lawyer, Deborah Jackson.

“She recognizes the serious nature of what has happened and I don’t think we will see her in court again,” Jackson said of her client.

The incidents came to light when one of the couple’s children was interviewed by child welfare officials for undisclosed reasons, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune Review.

The boy and another sibling, who is 4, have been staying with relatives following the charges, but will be returned to the home, court officials said. A younger sibling, 1, has already been reunited with the parents.

Upon completion of two years probation, charges against the Lenharts will be dismissed and records expunged, Jackson said.

A previous judge in the case did not want to allow the Lenharts to enter the rehabilitative program, but Jackson said she was pleased with McCormick’s decision.

Nurse struck by lightning inside her house was saved by her flip flops

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Jennifer-LyonsA care home nurse struck by lightning inside her house was saved by her ­rubber-soled flip-flops.

Jennifer Lyons, 49, was on the phone when a 300,000-volt strike hit a satellite dish and set her home on fire.

The bolt forced plug switches from the walls and blew out the hot water, phone lines and internet.

Jennifer said: “It was like a bomb.

“I was knocked back.

“There was debris everywhere.

“A fireman said it was one of the most unusual cases he’d seen.”

She was left with just a bump on her forehead after the storm on Saturday.

The mum, of Chippenham, Wilts, added: “You think you’d be safe from lightning in your own home.”

It is thought sparks of electricity in the air were attracted to microwaves emitted from the phone.

But Jennifer’s rubber soles ­insulated her and stopped the electricity from passing straight through her body.

Bartender Lights Customer’s Face On Fire While Making ‘Flaming Lamborghini’ (VIDEO)

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A bartender in Lithuania accidentally set a customer’s face on fire while making a drink, and the gruesome moment was captured on video.

The incident happened July 11 at Naktinis Tbilisis club in Panevezys, according to an article in the Lithuanian news portal Lrytas, per a translation by The Huffington Post.

In the video, the bartender can be seen preparing the drink — called a Flaming Lamborghini — when a flame shoots out at the man, who catches fire. Other patrons appear to put out the fire out by smothering the man’s head with their hands.

The victim’s sister said in the article that the bar owner and the bartender visited her brother in the hospital. While the article did not specify the man’s injuries, it did note that he was taken into surgery.

Several English-language outlets have since picked up the video, though none has offered an update on the man’s condition.

U.K. tabloid Mirror, however, offers a description of the dangerous cocktail shown in the video:

A Flaming Lamborghini consists of sambuca and kahlua which is then set alight and drunk quickly through a straw while it’s still on fire, the drink is then doused with a shot each of Baileys and blue curacao which is then drunk.

Man Sues Hospital Claiming Penis Amputated Instead of Circumcised

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scalpel-558x279An Alabama man who went in to a hospital last month for a circumcision awoke after surgery to find his penis had been amputated, his lawyer said on Thursday.

Johnny Lee Banks Jr., 56, said in a lawsuit filed in state court earlier this week that no one at the Princeton Baptist Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama, had told him why it had been necessary to remove his penis, according to his attorney, John Graves.

“My client is devastated,” Graves said.

Banks, who is married and does not work due to a disability, did not recall the precise date of the incident but believed it occurred in June, his attorney said.

The lawsuit does not specify a monetary value of the damages, Graves said.

Named as defendants in the lawsuit are the hospital, the Simon-Williamson Clinic, Urology Centers of Alabama and two doctors, Graves said.

Spokeswomen for the hospital, the clinic and Urology Centers of Alabama did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment.

Man Sentenced For Beating Toddler To Death While Trying To Turn Her Gay

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An attorney called his client “deranged” just before a judge sentenced the man to prison for biting and beating his two-year-old daughter to death in what officials said was an attempt to make her gay.

Donovan-HaynesGenesee Circuit Judge Joseph J. Farah said Monday, July 21, that the allegations against Donovan Lamar Haynes were “astonishing” and among the most unconscionable he’s heard during his time on the bench.

Haynes, 23, was sentenced Monday to 18 years, 9 months to 40 years in prison after pleading no contest to second-degree murder for the beating death of his daughter, Ti’Airra Woodward. A no contest plea is not an admission of guilt but is treated as such at sentencing.

Farah also sentenced him to serve a concurrent 5-15 years in prison for first-degree child abuse.

The sentence was agreed to by both sides as part of the plea agreement.

Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton said the victim’s family was in agreement with the agreement.

Before Farah handed down his sentence, he read briefly from a pre-sentence investigation report that outlined the circumstances surrounding the girl’s death.

The report claimed that Haynes beat the girl in an attempt to turn her gay in hopes that she would avoid men like him, who had a history of treating women poorly.

“You don’t beat her in hopes she’s going to turn gay,” Farah said, adding that Haynes should have used his own life experience to teach his daughter how to avoid problem men.

The judge said Haynes also beat the girl in an attempt to toughen her up.

However, Farah added Haynes’ actions made it so no one would ever have to worry about the girl being tough.

“Dad took care of that,” Farah said. “He took care of it in one fell swoop.”

Ti’Airra was pronounced dead at Hurley Medical Center after she stopped breathing at a home on Donal Drive in Flint Township in what police call a child abuse case.

A medical examiner’s report indicated she died of internal bleeding from a lacerated liver.

Adult human bite marks were also found all over the girl’s body, police said.

Prosecutors said Ti’Airra was found unresponsive in the basement of Haynes’ mother’s Flint Township home.

Attorney Elbert Hatchett, who represented Haynes, had strong words for the man he was hired to represent.

“This case is a case that defies reason, logic, common sense,” Hatchett said. “(It’s a) tragedy to see the life of an innocent child snuffed out for no reason at all.”

Hatchett said Haynes is “deranged” and that he needs to undergo psychological counseling while in prison.

“I don’t have any sympathy for him,” Hatchett said of his client. “Hopefully, judge, he will repent.”

Ti’Airra’s mother, Nakeesha Woodward, left the court in tears after briefly addressing Farah before Haynes was sentenced. She returned to the courtroom in time to hear her daughter’s killer get sentenced to prison.

“I lost a child,” a tearful Woodward said as she lobbied Farah for a stiff maximum sentence.

State sentencing guidelines would have allowed Haynes to be sentenced to more than 31 years in prison if a jury convicted him of second-degree murder, according to Farah.

Haynes also initially faced charges of open murder, first-degree murder and torture that could have earned him life in prison without parole if convicted.

Before being sentenced to prison, Haynes attempted to withdraw his no contest plea.

Haynes told Farah that he felt his attorney could have secured a plea agreement that included less prison time.

He addressed the court briefly before Farah handed down his sentence, thanking his family for their support and the court’s time in hearing his case.

Hatchett, however, said that his client was being pressured by family members to take the case to trial rather than go forward with the plea agreement.

“There is no likelihood — none — that he would be found not guilty by a jury of his peers,” Hatchett said.

However, Leyton said his office pursued the plea agreement after flaws developed with the case.

“We had some concerns about the testimony of a key witness,” Leyton said.

Farah refused to let Haynes withdraw his plea, saying that a withdrawal was not in the interest of justice.

“I felt that he was playing with the court,” Woodward said. “He has no remorse.”