Man Arrested After Exercising Naked in the Street

0

timothy+loweAn Arlington man is facing an indecent exposure charge after police say he was found doing push-ups in the middle of the street naked.

Officers were called to the 3200 block of. S. 24th Street just before 8 p.m. on Oct. 16 after receiving several reports about the strange behavior.

According to Arlington County police, 31-year-old Timothy Lowe ignored their commands and approached the officers aggressively while yelling obscenities. Lowe, who was allegedly under the influence of narcotics, was taken into custody after officers used a stun gun on him.

He has been charged with indecent exposure, disorderly conduct and obstruction of justice. Lowe is being held without bond.

Woman records herself doing drugs, judge orders her held

0

A Framingham woman recorded herself doing heroin and cocaine while making fun of her probation officer, then posted it online, authorities said on Friday.

videoAfter viewing the video on Friday, Framingham District Court Judge Douglas Stoddart ordered Allison Voner, 23, held on $5,000 bail on one case, revoked her probation on another case and ordered her held on a warrant for another court.

“I just saw the most incriminating video I’ve ever seen in my 36 years” in the legal profession, Stoddart said.

The video was not shown in open court.

On Thursday, probation officer Elisa Currie sought a warrant for Voner’s arrest. She told Judge Cesar Archilla that the Natick Police had obtained a video that showed Voner driving a car, which she is not allowed to do, while smoking or inhaling both heroin and cocaine, and going on a tirade against a probation officer. The video appeared to be taken outside of a courthouse.

Archilla issued the warrant and Framingham Police arrested Voner on Thursday at 2:55 p.m.

After viewing the video in his chambers with prosecutor Ben Franklin, Currie and Voner’s lawyer, John Daly Jr., Stoddart ordered Voner held on $5,000 on on open possession of herion case, without hearing Daly’s argument to free his client.

Stoddart also held her without bail for violating her probation on a credit card fraud case from Natick last year, and held her on a Brookline District Court warrant on an unspecified charge.

After the judge announced his decision, Daly tried to convince Stoddart to reconsider.

“She frequently Facebooks out entertaining videos,” said Daly. “It was meant as an entertaining video only. It was comedy.”

Stoddart said, “She achieved her goal. It was the most entertaining video I’ve seen. It was entertaining and it was tragic.”

After the judge repeated his orders, Voner asked him to send her to a drug rehabilitation facility. After her mother filed a formal request, Stoddart denied it.

“I’m a little suspect on the timing of her (Voner’s) request,” said Stoddart. “She appears to be very intelligent, very manipulative.”

Wannabe Playboy Model In Ecstasy Trafficking Bust

0

A wannabe Playboy model and a male associate were arrested by federal agents after flying into a California airport from Las Vegas in a private plane loaded with a massive cache of Ecstasy pills and powder, according to court records.

Acting on information that the plane may have been involved with the smuggling of drugs or currency, investigators questioned the duo upon landing last Thursday at John Wayne Airport in Orange County.

kristaboseleyfb1 (1)Krista Boseley, 30, and pilot Gilles Lapointe, 61, were both carrying large sums of cash that they claimed to have won the prior evening at the Bellagio casino. The pair, both of whom are Canadian citizens, subsequently had their bags searched after a drug detection dog alerted to the presence of narcotics.

As detailed in a U.S. District Court complaint, agents found about 30,000 Ecstasy pills in Lapointe’s luggage, and another 28,000 pills inside the plane. The aircraft (seen below) also contained nearly 90 pounds of powdered Ecstasy and a “GPS Tracker Detector” that, investigators allege, is used by drug smugglers “to determine whether law enforcement has placed a tracking device on their vehicles or planes.”

Boseley, pictured above, and Lapointe were arrested after agents found the Ecstasy stash. Boseley denied knowledge of the drugs being trafficked or “anything illegal.” Lapointe, however, appears to have made incriminating statements to agents, though they are not detailed in the felony complaint charging the duo with conspiracy to distribute narcotics.

kristaboseleyfrontFollowing Boseley’s arrest, investigators learned that she had been stopped last year by Los Angeles Police Department officers who found her with more than $40,000 in cash. “Boseley stated at that time that the money belonged to someone else.” She was also found in possession of a receipt showing that Lapointe’s plane had been refueled at the Santa Barbara airport.

Boseley, who has worked as a real estate agent in Vancouver, is a tattoo enthusiast who once posedfor a series of naked photos during a Playboy open call. Her Facebook page is filled with assorted affirmations and musings, like “Don’t judge someone because they sin differently than you.” In her last update, on October 3, Boseley reposted a graphic announcing, “Yes, I’m crazy. No, you can’t have some.”

A federal magistrate has ordered Lapointe locked up in advance of an October 24 preliminary hearing. Boseley’s custody status is not detailed in court records, nor is she listed among inmates being held by the federal Bureau of Prisons or the Orange County Sheriff’s Department.

Halloween Candy May Contain Marijuana, Denver Police Warn

0

With marijuana now legal in Colorado and cannabis candy a big part of the scene,Denver police are issuing an unusual warning ahead of Halloween. In short, they want people to know that not all candy is for kids.

Halloween-Candy“With edibles gaining in popularity we thought it was important to alert the community to the possibility that it’s easy to mistake what looks like regular candy with a marijuana edible,” Denver police spokesman Lt. Matt Murray told Fox31 Denver.

The department recruited Patrick Johnson, owner of Urban Dispensary, to create a video (above) showing how pot candies can resemble traditional candies. Johnson said some manufacturers of “knocked-off candy” buy sweets in bulk and then spray them with hash oil. Once the oil dries, there’s no way to tell the difference.

“The problem is that some of these products look so similar to candy that’s been on the market, that we’ve eaten as children, that there’s really no way for a child or a parent or anybody, even an expert in the field, to tell you whether or not a product is infused,” Johnson said in the video.

He said that if kids bring home candy that don’t look like something from a recognizable brand, toss it.

However, some believe this may be unnecessary fear-mongering.

“This is just another way for those who most benefit from marijuana prohibition to try to convince the public that prohibition protects children,” wrote the Ladybud blog. “The real message here is that the average citizen should be wary of cannabis users; they might want to drug your kids and get them ‘hooked’ too.”

Jacob Sullum, a contributor to the Forbes website, writes that the warning seems to fit the pattern of other, often unconfirmed, Halloween candy scares.

He notes that a database search turns up no evidence of marijuana candy being passed off as Halloween candy since 1996, the year California legalized medical marijuana use, but several examples of warnings that it might happen.

“There is a cost to such bogeyman stories, and it goes beyond needlessly discarded candy,” Sullum writes. “These rumors portray the world as a darker, more dangerous place than it really is, which is probably not conducive to a happy childhood or a successful adulthood.”

Man has crack in buttocks …….. 49 bags worth!

0

Police arrested a city man for selling crack cocaine on Stamford’s West Side Thursday afternoon.,

Michael Ford, 30, of 89 Richmond Hill Ave. was charged with possession of narcotics, possession of narcotics with intent to sell and possession of marijuana.

He was held by police in lieu of a $10,000 court appearance bond.

Capt. Richard Conklin said officers in the Narcotics and Organized Crime squad heard that Ford was selling crack on Richmond Hill Ave.

At about 5:30 p.m. they walked up to him in front of 89 Richmond Hill Ave., and asked him if  he had any crack.

Ford took a moment to answer because he had something in his mouth and took a few gulps before he cleared his wind pipe, Conklin said.

Ford admitted to having some marijuana in his pocket and police found a baggie next to where he was sitting on some steps that contained crack cocaine. When he was strip searched at police headquarters, he was found to have concealed 49 bags of crack cocaine in his buttocks, Conklin said.

90-year-old woman caught growing marijuana: “I just thought they were nice plants”

0
843580a41b0e0f8327a8578392f5fee75e7d71cd5fa37f325e2d4fb55fae6604Officers in Gislaved raided the 90-year-old’s house, where they found marijuana growing in potplants.
“I thought they were just nice plants,” she told officers at the time.
Exactly how the police found out about the stash at her apartment remains unclear, reported the Expressen newspaper.
An investigation has been launched as to where exactly the drugs came from and how they ended up in the pensioner’s home.
It remains unknown if the woman will be charged for narcotic crimes, but such cases can be dropped if officials can’t prove intent.

Man Accused Of Trading Stolen $160,000 Diamond For $20 Of Weed

0

Accusations like this can really harsh a dude’s mellow.

n-DIAMOND-WEED-large300A former UPS employee in Arizona is accused of stealing a package containing a $160,000 diamond and trading it for $20 worth of weed, ABC-15 reports.

Walter Earl Morrison, 20, thought that the package he allegedly swiped while unloading cargo at Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix contained cash, according to a probable cause statement obtained by The Smoking Gun. In fact, the package contained one pricey stone.

Authorities say the “half-baked bandit” traded the diamond for the equivalent of two joints of marijuana.

The diamond was later recovered and returned to its intended recipient.