Georgia Siblings Charged With Having Sex In Church Parking Lot After Watching The Notebook

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A brother and sister were arrested this morning in Effingham County and accused of having sex with each other in a tractor trailer parked at a church.

Christopher-BucknerTimothy-Savoy

Christopher Buckner, 20, of Guyton, and her brother, Timothy Savoy, 25, of Jackson, Ga., were arrested and charged with incest, aggravated sodomy and prowling, according to Sheriff’s Office spokesman David Ehsanipoor.

The spokesman said deputies answered a call at about 4:30 a.m. about a prowler in the area of Hester Road and Ga. 30.

As deputies were checking the area, they saw a man and woman walking down the road. The male said he was walking the female back to her house.

Deputies determined that the pair were brother and sister and that they had just had sex in a Kenworth tractor trailer, which was parked at Countryside Baptist Church, Ehsanipoor said.

He said they admitted having sex three times after watching the movie, “The Notebook.”

They were being held in the Effingham County jail.

Did a bug in iCloud’s ‘Find My iPhone’ function help 4chan hacker steal nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence and 100 other celebrities?

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A flaw in the ‘Find My iPhone’ function of Apple’s iCloud service may have helped a hacker to steal nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence and ‘100 other celebrities’, it today emerged.

article-2739215-20F5B99300000578-995_634x887The hacker claims he or she broke into stars’ iCloud accounts, including those of the Hunger Games actress, Kate Upton and Rihanna, before publishing them on 4chan, the image-sharing forum.

A list of the alleged victims of the hack – a staggering 101 in total – has also been posted online; most of whom have not seen any photographs leaked by the hacker.

A spokesman for Oscar winner Lawrence confirmed to MailOnline the photos of her are genuine.

‘This is a flagrant violation of privacy. The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos of Jennifer Lawrence,’ the emailed statement read.

Following the publication of the images of Sunday night, experts have voiced their concerns over how the hacker managed to access them. Now, reports suggest that a specific flaw in the ‘Find My iPhone’ service may have been to blame.

Despite the story breaking last night, Apple is still yet to confirm or deny whether its software was the target of the hacking. However, in the meantime, it has quietly issued a ‘patch’, or fix, for the bug.

The firm’s iCloud service, which was launched in October 2011 and is used by more than 320million people worldwide, secures data by encrypting it when it is sent over the web, storing it in an encrypted format when kept on server, and using secure tokens for authentication.

This means that data is protected from hackers while it is being sent to devices and stored online.

This suggests the hackers were able to obtain the login credentials of the accounts, and therefore pretend to be the user, in order to bypass this encryption.

HOW COULD A HACKER HAVE ACCESSED PHOTOS VIA ICLOUD?

Apple’s iCloud service allows users to access their music, photos, documents, contacts and email online.

When activated, the service automatically stores users’ photos, emails, documents and other information in a ‘cloud’, allowing them to sync the data across a range of platforms. These include iPhones, iPads and MacBooks.

Users can then access their information from any internet-connected device using a log-in and password.

Reports suggest a specific flaw in the service’s ‘Find My iPhone’ service may have allowed a hacker to access celebrities’ private images.

Code was spotted on software development site Github, that would have allowed malicious users to use ‘brute force’ to gain an account’s password on iCloud.

A message has since appeared saying that Apple has issued a ‘patch’, or fix, for the bug.

It is possible for users to enhance the security of their documents by turning off iCloud through Settings > iCloud on their device when they are not using it.

They can also turn on two-step verification for their iCloud account, meaning if someone tries to log into their account from elsewhere then they will need to supply a four-digit security code.

At present, iCloud has more than 320 million users. Those who wish to change their Apple ID can go to appleid.apple.com and follow the steps to reset their password.

Apple is yet to confirm or deny whether iCloud was involved in the hacking.

Despite the claims, it is possible that the photos were not taken via iCloud, but another platform. Theories include:

Social engineering

The hackers may have also used ‘social engineering’ techniques to obtain Apple IDs and passwords based on other information.

This includes email address, a mother’s maiden name, a date of birth, and more – all of which is easier to find out about celebrities than the everyday user.

If a celebrity uses the same password across accounts, this would be then make it relatively easy for someone to hack if they had the right information.

This theory would account for Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s claims that the leaked photos of her were taken with her husband ‘years ago’.

This amount of time exceeds iCloud’s Photo Stream facility, which keeps images for a maximum of 30 days before they are deleted.

Google Drive hack

In June, Google announced its Drive service had a flaw that meant private information was at risk from hackers.

Google patched the flaw in June, but the large number of victims in the 4chan leak also suggests that the hack may have begun months ago – at the time of this flaw.

Dropbox flaw

Similarly, in May, a flaw was found in Dropbox accounts that could have given unauthorised access to accounts

article-2739215-20F44D3F00000578-54_306x423Earlier today, The Next Web spotted code on software development site Github, that would have allowed malicious users to use ‘brute force’ to gain an account’s password on Apple iCloud, and in particular its Find my iPhone service.

A message has since appeared saying that Apple has issued a fix for the bug. ‘The end of the fun, Apple has just patched,’ read an update on the post.

Brute force, also known as ‘brute force cracking’, is a trial-and-error method used to get plain-text passwords from encrypted data.

Just as a criminal might break into, or ‘crack’ a safe by trying many possible combinations, a brute-force cracking attempt goes through all possible combinations of characters in sequence.

In a six-letter attack, the hacker will start at ‘a’ and end at ‘//////’

Owen Williams from The Next Web, who discovered the bug, said: ‘The Python script found on GitHub appears to have allowed a malicious user to repeatedly guess passwords on Apple’s “Find my iPhone” service without alerting the user or locking out the attacker.

‘Given enough patience and the apparent hole being open long enough, the attacker could use password dictionaries to guess common passwords rapidly. Many users use simple passwords that are the same across services so it’s entirely possible to guess passwords using a tool like this.

‘If the attacker was successful and gets a match by guessing passwords against Find my iPhone, they would be able to, in theory, use this to log into iCloud and sync the iCloud Photo Stream with another Mac or iPhone in a few minutes, again, without the attacked user’s knowledge.

‘We can’t be sure that this is related to the leaked photos, but the timing suggests a possible correlation.’

Rob Cotton, CEO at web security experts NCC Group added: ‘Cyber security is not just a technology problem, humans are very much key to its success. In our day-to-day work we see too many cases of employees divulging sensitive information without first verifying the legitimacy of the request.

‘People often point the finger at technology when they’ve been the victim of a cyber attack, but poor password choices or naivety in the face of a seemingly innocent email is regularly to blame.’

Human error, in a variety of ways, said Mr Cotton, often played a part.

Find My iPhone helps users locate and protect their iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac – if it’s ever lost or stolen.

Despite the claims, it is possible that the photos were not taken via iCloud, but as a result of ‘social engineering’.

This form of hacking works by studying which online services your target uses, before compiling as much information on them as possible, such as their email address, a mother’s maiden name, a date of birth, and more.

This data can then be used to trick them into handing over their details or guess their password. If a celebrity uses the same password across accounts, this would be then make it relatively easy for someone to hack if they had the right information.

But the sheer number of names on the list makes this unlikely – unless a large number of hackers were taking part, and a large number of celebrities had poor password management.

WHAT IS 4CHAN?

4Chan is an image-based forum where users can post photos and videos anonymously, as well as comment on others’ posts.

Registration is not required, nor possible.

The site is split into various boards, each with their own specific content and guidelines.

These include content on music, photography, gaming, comics, fashion and images of celebrities, such as Jennifer Lawrence.

Its main board, called ‘Random’, features minimal rules on what can be posted. It is often where controversial images and videos are uploaded by users.

When it launched in 2003, the site was used to post photos and discuss Japanese anime.

However, it quickly expanded, and is now linked to various internet subcultures and activism.

It has also been linked to a number of high-profile hacks.

In 2006, users of 4chan and other websites ‘raided’ American white nationalist Hal Turner by launching multiple attacks and prank calling his phone-in radio show.

Meanwhile, in 2008, the Yahoo email account of Sarah Palin was hacked by an anonymous 4chan user, before posting her password and screenshots on Wikileaks.

This followed criticism of Palin supposedly using private email accounts for governmental work.

And in May 2009, members of the site attacked YouTube, posting pornographic videos on the site

Other notable services to allow users to access files remotely include Dropbox and Google Drive, which enable users to keep more of their files close to hand without taking up huge amounts of memory on their devices.

When activated, iCloud automatically stores users’ photos, emails, documents and other information in a ‘cloud’, allowing them to sync the data across a range of platforms. These include iPhones, iPads and MacBooks.

Users can then access their information from any internet-connected device using a log-in and password.

On Sunday, the hacker wrote that he or she is accepting Paypal donations for a video which allegedly shows Lawrence performing a sex act.

The hacker also wrote, ‘I know no one will believe me, but i have a short lawrence video

‘Is way too short, a little over 2 minutes and you only get to see her boobs

‘Anyways, if somebody wants it let me know how i can upload it anonymously (i dont want the FBI over me, and you dont wanna know how I got this video.)’

‘Jennifer Lawrence’ became a Twitter trend on Sunday afternoon.

Meanwhile, Perez Hilton has apologised on Twitter for posting some of the naked photos of Lawrence on his blog, saying he feels ‘awful’.

The celebrity blogger, who has since deleted the photos from the site, told his followers: ‘I acted in haste just to get the post up and didn’t really think things through. I’m sorry.’

He added: ‘Upon further reflection and just sitting with my actions, I don’t feel comfortable even keeping the censored photos up. I am removing them.’

A spokesman for Kate Upton sent MailOnline a statement from her attorney, Lawrence Shire, about the leaked photos. ‘This is obviously an outrageous violation of our client Kate Upton’s privacy,’ the statement said.

iCloud secures data by encrypting it when it is sent over the web, storing it in an encrypted format when kept on server, and using secure tokens for authentication (explained above). This suggests the hackers were able to obtain the login credentials of the accounts, and pretend to be the user, in order to bypass this encryption

‘We intend to pursue anyone disseminating or duplicating these illegally obtained images to the fullest extent possible.’

Actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who confirmed she was a hacking victim, wrote on Twitter ‘To those of you looking at photos I took with my husband years ago in the privacy of our home, hope you feel great about yourselves.’

She also expressed sympathy for others, tweeting: ‘Knowing those photos were deleted long ago, I can only imagine the creepy effort that went into this. Feeling for everyone who got hacked.’

Winstead implied she was facing difficulties on Twitter on Sunday, when she tweeted ‘Great day for the block button!’

WHAT IS A BRUTE FORCE ATTACK?

Earlier today The Next Web spotted code on Github that would have allowed malicious users to ‘brute force’ an account’s password on Apple iCloud, and in particular its Find my iPhone service.

Brute force, also known as brute force cracking, is a trial-and-error method used by to get plain-text passwords from encrypted data.

Just as a criminal might break into, or ‘crack’ a safe by trying many possible combinations, a brute-force cracking attempt goes through all possible combinations of characters in sequence.

In a six-letter attack, the hacker will start at ‘a’ and end at ‘//////’.

The hackers may have also used ‘social engineering’ techniques to obtain Apple IDs and passwords based on other information they could find.

This includes email address, a mother’s maiden name, a date of birth, and more – all of which is easier to find out about celebrities than the everyday user.

If a celebrity uses the same password across accounts, this would be relatively easy for someone to hack if they had the right information.

Twitter is shutting down accounts that are disseminating the pictures. In response to a request for comment from MailOnline, a Twitter spokesman said: ‘We do not comment on individual accounts, for privacy and security reasons,’ and referred MailOnline to the company’s content boundaries web page.

Photographs that allegedly show Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting, Lea Michele, Brie Larson, Kirsten Dunst, Becca Tobin, Hope Solo, Teresa Palmer, Krysten Ritter, McKayla Maroney, Jessica Brown-Findlay, Ali Michael, and Yvonne Strahovski appeared online.

Some of the women named as alleged victims – but who have not had any of their supposedly nude photographs leaked – include Aubrey Plaza, Candice Swanepoel, Cara Delevingne, Cat Deeley, Hillary Duff, Kelly Brook, Michelle Keegan, Selena Gomez, Rihanna and Vanessa Hudgens.

A spokesman for Keegan, the former Coronation Street actress, said there was no evidence she had been hacked and nothing had appeared online to suggest so.

A rep for Keke Palmer – who was mentioned on the list but whose allegedly ‘nude’ photographs were not leaked – told MailOnline ‘Obviously there is no truth to this list and no nude photos of Ms. Palmer.’

Model Gabi Grecko – also named on the list but of whom, no photographs have been published – told Daily Mail Australia: ‘I feel like anything I didn’t release myself that was accessed without my permission is shameful.’

‘Some people are very private and maybe hugely affected and feel violated because of this. There have also been many suicides connected to non consented photos being released.’

Not all of the nude photographs that have been published are genuine, however.

A spokesman for Ariana Grande told MailOnline photos that claim to show her are fake. Similarly, Nickelodeon star Victoria Justice wrote on Twitter that her image was faked. She tweeted, ‘These so called nudes of me are FAKE people. Let me nip this in the bud right now. *pun intended.*’

Yesterday, Perez Hilton apologied on Twitter for posting some of the naked photos of Lawrence on his blog. The celebrity blogger, who has since deleted the photos, told his followers: ‘I acted in haste to get the post up’

Seth Rogen criticized the hacker on Twitter, writing ‘Posting pics hacked from a cell phone is really no different than selling stolen merchandise.’

‘I obviously am not comparing women to merchandise. Just legally speaking, it shouldn’t be tolerated to repost stolen pics,’ Rogen also tweeted.

A representative of Brazilian model Lisalla Montenegro said: ‘Regrettably Lisalla Montenegro’s name is on the list of hacked celebrities. Thankfully nothing has surfaced.

‘In precaution, the authorities have been informed and Lisalla’s lawyer will pursue anyone duplicating or distributing these stolen images.’

A spokesman for Kelly Brook refused to comment on the hack.

Park Ranger Found Asleep With Beer Between Legs In Patrol Car

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That’s no way to protect the forest.

A California State Parks ranger was allegedly found drunk and asleep in his patrol car with a beer between his legs, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. He’s been placed on leave and his peace officer status has been revoked pending an investigation, the paper noted, citing the California Highway Patrol.

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A passerby spotted the ranger, Tyson Young, in Humboldt Redwoods State Park on Aug. 15 and first tried to wake Young. “I shook him, really shook him,” the observer, who wished to remain anonymous, told the Lost Coast Outpost.

Then the man told the outlet he called 911 and took a photo of the ranger. The picture was Tweeted by the Lost Coast Outpost. California State Parks confirmed that Young is the man in the photo.

According to the outlets, Young eventually left the scene and was later pulled over and arrested on suspicion of drunk driving by the CHP. He reportedly faces a separate investigation by California State Parks.

Young carried a firearm as part of his job.

“We do not tolerate alcohol in the workplace,” a parks spokeswoman told The Huffington Post.

The Lost Coast Journal wrote that Young “has served as the supervising ranger for Humboldt Redwoods and Richardson Grove state parks.”

Cameo Crispi On Trial For Allegedly Setting Fire To Ex’s Home With Bacon

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n-CRISPI-largeA Utah woman accused of using a pound of bacon to start a fire in her ex-boyfriend’s house will stand trial on arson charges.

Police say Cameo Adawn Crispi, 32, repeatedly called and texted her former flame from his home in March, where she left the bacon over a lit burner.

The Deseret News reports the man wasn’t home and called police saying he wanted Crispi out of his house. Officers arrived and saw smoke flowing out the front door. Inside, they found hot coals on the floor around an open wood stove and the burned bacon.

Charging documents say Crispi’s blood-alcohol level was 0.346, four times the legal limit.

Crispi is due back in court in October to face arson, burglary and other charges.

“Dear Madam, we are writing to inform you that you are dead”

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A Lincolnshire woman in her eighties was told she had passed away in a letter from her pension provider.

6818924-largeThe blunder included a short message of condolence from an employee of Standard Life but Spalding resident Mrs Fulton, although frail, remains very much alive.

The letter was sent to the 80-year-old’s home last month and addressed to the executors of Mrs B Fulton.

The pensioner was described as being “extremely upset”, but Standard Life have since apologized for the mistake, blaming it on human error. 

“You can imagine how shocked I was to receive the letter,” Mrs Fulton told the Telegraph. “Fortunately I still have my wits about me, but I dread to think what the consequences could have been for someone in more fragile health than myself.”

Standard Life explained that a routine pension payment failed and a staff member had incorrectly marked the reason for the payment being returned as “deceased”.

A spokesman told the Telegraph: “We are very sorry this occurred and for the concern it has caused. We apologized immediately and carried out a review to understand what had happened. We reissued the pension payment immediately and sent Mrs Fulton flowers and £50 as apology too.”

Egyptian cleric says men should be allowed to spy on women in the shower if they have ‘pure intentions.’

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Men can spy on women in the shower, an extremist cleric has argued in Egypt, prompting outrage from other Islamic scholars.

Cairo mosqueAccording to Osama al-Qusi, a Salafist or ultraorthodox preacher, peeping toms can watch a woman wash as long as they are interested in marrying her.

“If you were really honest and wanted to marry that woman, and you were able to hide and watch her in secret, and see the things that she wouldn’t usually let you see before marrying her, then it is acceptable as long as your intentions are pure,” Qusi said in an online video translated by the al-Arabiya news network.

Qusi’s words sparked heavy criticism from those who said he was using religion to win attention.

Egypt’s minister for religious affairs, Mohamed Mokhtar, condemned him “and his ilk”, saying: “Where is the glory and masculinity in watching a woman shower? Would you allow this to happen to your daughter?”

Mokhtar stressed that fatwas, or Islamic edicts, should only be issued by qualified clerics, and denounced Qusi’s claims as anathema to Islam.

The minister also confirmed plans to launch a grassroots campaign against both atheists and Islamic extremists. He has already banned tens of thousands of unlicensed preachers, accused of extremist teachings, from working in Egyptian mosques.

In recent years, oddball clerics in Egypt have regularly been ridiculed for hardline statements. One called for the destruction of Pharaonic icons, while another said Muslims should not drive Christian priests to church. But such pronouncements are considered far from mainstream Islamic belief.

Short on money? Why not start claiming your child has terminal cancer?

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leatha-kaye-slausonLeatha Kaye Slauson, 30, of Atlantic Iowa is facing charges linked to an allegation that she solicited money and widespread attention by claiming her 5-year-old daughter had terminal cancer. The child is not sick.

Slauson is currently charged with Felony Child Endangerment and Distribution of Drugs to a Child Under 18. That latter is a Class B felony.

The community had rallied behind efforts to help Riley Slauson enjoy what everyone believed was a life shortened by cancer. Fund-raising events helped pay for a trip to Disney World and to ease the family’s financial burden. The donations included more than $1,000 to an online donation site.

County Attorney Dan Feistner said Friday the child’s mother had admitted, “It was all, in essence, a ruse if you will on her part.”

The alleged scam began to take shape in October, 2013. Atlantic Police Chief Steve Green said, “She brought forth the story that the child was declining in health,” and a flood of support followed.

That story escalated through an elaborate web that drew in donations by word of mouth and Internet outreach.

Feistner said, “The community of Cass County, city of Atlantic commenced a flow-blown support of this individual.”

How much money was involved in this is uncertain. Feistner said, “It’s difficult to determine at this time,” but the donations involved checks, cash and payment for goods and services.

The story began to unravel as Riley was preparing to enter kindergarten. The school was looking into setting up a program for Riley and authorities say the medical contacts involved in that process turned up irregularities.

That triggered a rapidly unfolding investigation that resulted in charges within 24 hours.

Riley and four siblings are now in their father’s custody. Investigators say Leatha Slauson is the only person who appears to have been involved in any allegedly illegal activity.

She is currently being held in the county jail. Bond was initially withheld. A magistrate will review the case with the addition of the drug charge that was added Friday after the original Child Endangerment charge was filed.

The drug involved was Cannabis oil and Riley tested positive for that.

Feistner said, “There was a presence of THC in the child. That’s correct.”

The investigation is ongoing. The prosecutor said it’s possible that other legal action could follow. “Fraud, theft, I think there are possible other charges,” he said but that’s speculative at this point in the case.

Both Feistner and Chief Green said that while all of this appears to have been a con, what was genuine was the response of the community to the plight of an ostensibly ill child.

Chief Green said, “This isn’t the first time this community has stepped up for people. We do it for everybody.”

The chief himself donated to the cause.

“I did,” he said. “As a matter of fact my wife had cancer last year so we’re pretty invested in the situation.”

Feistner said communities near and far have contributed thousands of dollars. The money that’s been accounted for is currently frozen. Feistner says it’s not yet clear what will become of the funds.