What luck! Mother stumbles across tiny meteorite worth $20,000 during walk in park with pup

Stay-at-home mother Brenda Salveson was just walking her collie in Lotus, California, when she happened upon a fragment of a fallen star.

Meteorites landed in in El Dorado County several days ago, according to CBS, and dozens of treasure-seekers have descended upon Lotus Park, looking for pieces of the fireball.

Mrs Salveson’s 17 gram rock, equal to the size of a tablespoon of sugar, could be worth more than $20,000.

Twinkle Twinkle: Stay-at-home mother Brenda Salveson was just walking her collie in Lotus, California, when she happened upon a tiny comet

Twinkle Twinkle: Stay-at-home mother Brenda Salveson was just walking her collie in Lotus, California, when she happened upon a tiny comet

 

Value: Mrs Salveson's 17 gram rock, equal to the size of a tablespoon of sugar, could be worth more than $20,000

Value: Mrs Salveson’s 17 gram rock, equal to the size of a tablespoon of sugar, could be worth more than $20,000

Mrs Salveson brings her children and her dog to Lotus Park nearly every day for some fresh air.

‘It was sitting there at my toes like an Easter egg,’ she told CBS.

‘I was lucky, blessed, good karma.’

Thousands of people have come to that very park looking for their slice of the rock that fell from heaven, some from as far as Australia.

Put it in Your Pocket: Thousands of people have come to Lotus Park looking for their slice of the rock that fell from heaven
 

Treasure Hunt: Thousands of people are looking for their slice of the star

But not everyone has been as lucky as Mrs Salveson.

‘I’ve been out here my third day now,’ said Robert Clark of Grass Valley, to CBS. ‘Found one piece, one gram.’

Mrs Salveson showed her mini-meteorite to geologists and NASA scientists, who confirmed its outer-space origins.

Rock of Ages: Scientists told Mrs Salveson that it could be 4 to 6 billion years old

Rock of Ages: Scientists told Mrs Salveson that it could be 4 to 6 billion years old

‘As I opened my hand, there was a huge gasp,’ she said.

They told her it could be 4 to 6 billion years old.

Her young son, Tommy, was quick to bring the meteorite on another journey – to his classroom for a little show and tell.

Mrs Salveson has the rock locked up for now, as she’s not yet ready to part with her piece of the sky.

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